Best deals on used road bikes

Best deals on used road bikes

But, the sheer volume of choice can be daunting, and separating the wheat from the chafe to pin-point your dream buy is inevitably going to take a little time. Avoid ads which use a generic catalogue pic of the bike as new - you want pics of what is actually for sale. Streamline your search by giving some thought to the type of bike you want and buy a bike from a cyclist. Sites like Singletrackworld and Pinkbike have classified forums full of high-end used mountain bikes. The road.

How Much Should You Spend for a Good Road Bike?

Considering buying a second-hand bike online? You could save yourself a heap of cash but you ll need to be aware of the potential pitfalls. Read our advice on what to look for though, and you could bag yourself a bargain. Whatever the material you re going for, there are lots of things to look out for. Carbon has its own peculiarities that set it apart and make it trickier to assess.

In particular, you need to keep an eye out for hidden damage from a severe impact on a carbon bike, which may lead to a sudden failure. A bit of Sherlock Holmes work will give you a feel for the situation. For example, a mismatched set of wheels , where one or other of the rims has been replaced, might give you a clue as to whether the bike was crashed or involved in a mishap.

Remember to always ask why the current owner is selling the bike, as this could affect your purchase decision. If in doubt, have the bike checked out by a pro. If that s not an option or you prefer to do it yourself then here are 10 tips to bear in mind while it might be worth having a look at our guide to buying a bike on eBay too, if appropriate.

You ll need several tools, such as a measuring tape, chain checker, torch, multi-tool and a flat-head screwdriver. The right tools for the job. On steel, titanium, alloy and aluminium frames damage should be apparent — carbon can be a case apart however. Lift the bike up a few inches and allow it to drop, listening for rattles or clunking.

First, check the seatpost clamp area, particularly the slot. Cracks in the frame are an instant deal breaker. When checking the frame, closely inspect the surface of the finish. Have a look at the frame in good light, or with a torch. Bluish-white powdery deposits are sure signs of corrosion and will cause the mounts to break off. Check the stem clamping point. Do your homework and check how closely the current spec matches the original.

If the fork or front wheel have been replaced, ask why. To do this, lift the front wheel up and allow the bars to swing from side to side: If you can, drop the fork out and check the steerer and crown for corrosion. Then check the dropouts for the level of wear caused by the quick-release heads. Is there much corrosion? Check all attachments to the frame: There should be a plastic or metal plate.

A few surface scratches of the lacquer are okay — they can be touched up with model enamel. Check where the tubes are bonded to their joins. Joining methods vary depending on frame design. Even monocoque designs incorporate bonded, riveted or bolted metal elements. Check locations where the carbon or aluminium tubes are bonded into their joints. This can cause galvanic corrosion.

A little oxidation or peeling finish is okay, but be wary of large gaps or thick bubbling of paint. Besides the dropouts, check around the bottom bracket and just below the headset cups. Don t accept aluminium components older than five years. Contact points are a potential minefield from a safety standpoint. With carbon bars or seatposts, check for the same signs of stress as in point 2 the frame.

Under racing conditions, shorten that to two. Now open up the clamp and look for heavily worn spots or grooves, identifiable by worn anodising and exposed raw aluminium. Look for signs of crash damage, such as scrapes on the brake levers, bar ends, saddle edges and rear derailleur. Are the wheels running true?

The wheels and tyres need to be true and in good shape — this is important for the overall performance of the bike, and crucial for controlling eventual costs. Check for oxidation and cracks at spoke holes on the rim and hub. Give the wheels a spin and eyeball the gap between the brake pads. Equally, a rumbling sensation felt in the fork leg or tip is a sure sign of dry or worn bearings.

Check for chain wear. Now use your handy chain checker to detect any chain wear. Also, the tooth profile should be even on both sides and the forward edge not hooked. Cranks have a way of breaking at the worst possible time, so check the inside of the crank arms at the point where the specs arm length, brand and so on are etched or engraved, since this can lead to cracks. Inspect the pedal thread size engraved near the pedal threads and for gouges caused by a lack of pedal washers as well.

Inspect the cabling for fraying and splitting. Inspect the cables in the area pictured: Now squeeze the brakes and check that they snap back quickly and freely. With derailleurs and brakes, check for pivot and joint wear or sloppiness in the bushings. Grab the rear mech by the lower end of the cage and move it in and out towards the wheel. Give the handlebars a good twist.

Before your test ride, grab the bars and twist firmly. No cracking or creaking noises should be heard and it should feel firm ish , offering slight resistance to twisting. Then lock down quick-releases and find a safe, car-free area. Try riding with your hands off the bars to see if the bike tracks straight. Stand on the pedals and put a bit of muscle into it while swinging the bike left to right; there should be no cracking or crunching noises.

Test the brakes and try to lock the rear wheel just a bit. And once you get your bike, should you decide it could do with some new handlebar tape, head here to watch a video on how to replace this. Read our essential advice before buying a second-hand bike Immediate Media. On steel, titanium, alloy and aluminium frames damage should be apparent — carbon can be a case apart however Immediate Media.

Cracks in the frame are an instant deal breaker Immediate Media. Check the stem clamping point Immediate Media. Immediate Media. Check where the tubes are bonded to their joins Immediate Media. Don t accept aluminium components older than five years Immediate Media. Check for chain wear Immediate Media. Give the handlebars a good twist Immediate Media. Inspect the cabling for fraying and splitting Immediate Media. The right tools for the job Immediate Media.

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How to Buy a Used Road Bike

Purchasing a quality road bike is a significant investment. Buying a used bike is a frugal option if you are new to road cycling and looking for a cost-effective way to get started. Tracking down a great deal is similar to buying any second-hand item. You want to make sure the bike is in good condition, all the parts are in working order and that the bike is priced fairly.

You may have to compromise on handlebar width, too.

If you have limited budget and still want to buy a decent bike, you will need to research carefully. Still, there are many inexpensive, and still, great road bikes out there. We have reviewed most popular affordable bikes out there to save you some time and money. The frame is hand-made of aluminium alloy and has the classic geometry, where the top bar is completely parallel to road surface. It makes bike a universal choice for those cycling for hours or trying their first high-speed race.

How to Buy Used Bikes

Consumer Reports no longer updates this product category and maintains it for archival purposes only. We found that more money buys a lightweight frame made of carbon fiber, aluminum or a combination of both materials , or high-strength steel and other high-quality components. But you can still buy a good bike for just a few hundred dollars. If you re an avid cyclist, you may prefer a conventional road bike. Looking for a leisurely ride on flat, paved roads? A comfort bike may be more your speed. If rugged trails are in your sights, than a mountain bike might be best.

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: 5 Best - Entry Level Road Bikes 2016 (under $500) - Guide and Reviews

8 Best Cheap Road Bikes For About $ and Under

When you buy something using the retail links in our stories, we earn an affiliate commission that helps pay for our work. The biggest complaint among bike consumers these days seems to be price. The moment an online review is published, dozens of disgruntled critics descend to grouch over the exorbitant costs and absurdity of high-performance bikes. But the fact remains that bikes can be expensive. And all the grousing got me wondering: How much do you really need spend to buy a good-quality bike? And what do you get in return for pricing up? In general terms, more-expensive bikes are lighter, stiffer, and have better components. Most companies reserve their highest-grade carbon fiber for top models and use less-expensive materials—from slightly heavier carbon down to aluminum and steel—for lower-tier models. Considering that, in many cases, the second- and third-tier frames come from exactly the same molds and weigh just a few hundred grams more, they can be an excellent value.

How to buy a secondhand bike

This is a short primer on how to buy inexpensive used bikes for basic commuting or transportation no more than about 10 miles a day. Refer the list of used bike sellers at the bottom of this article. The most important part of buying a used bike is getting one that fits you. Check out our detailed guide to bike fit for more. Most bikes have gears in front and gears in back.

Used Bikes

By Leon Poultney T The explosion in popularity of road cycling means there is now a speed-focussed two-wheel machine to suit most budgets. Of course, you could go out and blow the deposit for a home on a carbon , wind tunnel-tested rocket that wouldn t look out of place in a professional peloton, but for most mere mortals, that s simply unfeasible. Of course, there is some compromise when looking at the lower end of the budget scale, but all of the bicycles recommended here are absolutely perfect for road cycling beginners or those looking to jump on a sporty steed from a different ride. Clearly there will be some compromise when looking at entry-level road bikes and these conciliations tend to come in the form of the groupset the gearing, chain and crankset fitted to the bike and the finishing kit, which are elements like the handlebars and saddle. On top of this, the frame is most probably going to be fashioned from aluminium, rather than high performance carbon fibre, which means it will be heavier than more expensive rivals. But this is no bad thing, as carbon fibre is very easily damaged and it takes a fairly tuned-in roadie to notice the benefits of using such an advanced material.

And, what better way to do it than on a new road bike? If you missed any of the conversation, catch part 1 here: Be sure to scroll to the comments below the articles for more excellent advice from expert RoadBikeRider readers. No discussion of bike buying is complete without a look at the used bicycle market. Because not everyone can afford to buy new and there are awesome used road machines to be had. When you go shopping for a used road bike, you can be overwhelmed by the number of choices and the huge differences in quality and condition. The sheer number of bikes and massive differences can be confusing. To prevent this and to help guarantee you find a nice used road bike, you need to start the process by narrowing down the search.

This guide will show you what research you should do, what to watch out for, and which brands can be trusted when you set out to buy a used bike.

Considering buying a second-hand bike online? You could save yourself a heap of cash but you ll need to be aware of the potential pitfalls. Read our advice on what to look for though, and you could bag yourself a bargain. Whatever the material you re going for, there are lots of things to look out for. Carbon has its own peculiarities that set it apart and make it trickier to assess. In particular, you need to keep an eye out for hidden damage from a severe impact on a carbon bike, which may lead to a sudden failure. A bit of Sherlock Holmes work will give you a feel for the situation. For example, a mismatched set of wheels , where one or other of the rims has been replaced, might give you a clue as to whether the bike was crashed or involved in a mishap. Remember to always ask why the current owner is selling the bike, as this could affect your purchase decision. If in doubt, have the bike checked out by a pro. If that s not an option or you prefer to do it yourself then here are 10 tips to bear in mind while it might be worth having a look at our guide to buying a bike on eBay too, if appropriate. You ll need several tools, such as a measuring tape, chain checker, torch, multi-tool and a flat-head screwdriver. The right tools for the job. On steel, titanium, alloy and aluminium frames damage should be apparent — carbon can be a case apart however.

Buy Now. Motobecane Gran Premio speed is rare for less than a grand. These models, like gravel Co-Op ARD and Salsa Journeyman below come with wide tires, flared bars, and mounts for racks and bags so you can cruise over any terrain. Recent advances in shifting are also making their way to less expensive bikes. Many of the better ones now have 1 X drivetrains one front chainring that simplify shifting and require less maintenance. Bikes are getting more gears in the back too, with 9- and speed drivetrains more common. The additional cogs allow smaller jumps between gears for faster shifting and wider overall range of gears that allows you to pedal easier without too much sacrifice to top-end speed. Recently, affordable bikes have started to come with the wider, more versatile tires found on more expensive road bikes.

What to expect for your money in the best-value road bike sector, plus your guide to choosing the right first road bike for you. The good news is, the best cheap road bikes can offer you miles of smiles without costing the earth. This simply means that features found on top end bikes will be available on mid-range models the next year, and eventually on cheap bikes. Hardtail of the Year. If you click on this then we may receive a small amount of money from the retailer when you purchase the item. Read more: An aluminium frame with carbon bladed forks and an alloy steerer, this model comes with Shimano Sora shifting and Shimano brakes. Buy now: Vitus Razor road bike review. An aluminium frame with a full carbon fork, plus Shimano Claris shifting.

VIDEO ON THEME: Top Tips for Buying a Used Bike - Cycling Weekly
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